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SAN FRANSISCO
Truth and Beauty: The Pre-Raphaelites and the Old Masters
Dates:30.06.2018-30.09.2018

In 1848—a year of political revolution across Europe—seven young Englishmen formed an artistic alliance aspiring to rebel against the contemporary Victorian art world. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, including William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, defied idealized figures popularized by Raphael and other High Renaissance artists to reflect the simplicity, spirituality, and beauty they found in late medieval and early Renaissance art. Truth and Beauty: The Pre-Raphaelites and the Old Masters is the first major exhibition to juxtapose examples by the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood with works that inspired its members, including Italian old masters Fra Angelico and Pietro Perugino and their Northern contemporaries Jan van Eyck and Hans Memling. It reveals how the Brotherhood’s aesthetic evolved over time to embrace artistic influences from the High and late Renaissance, such as Botticelli, Raphael, Titian, and Veronese. It also offers a rich multimedia opportunity to examine the artists’ attraction to stained glass, domestic decorations, and sixteenth-century textiles. Truth and Beauty: The Pre-Raphaelites and the Old Masters is the first major international loan exhibition to assemble works of art by members of England’s nineteenth-century Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood with the early Italian, Netherlandish, and German art that inspired them. Organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, this presentation will demonstrate the Pre-Raphaelites’ fascination with the Italian old masters, including Fra Angelico (ca. 1400–1455) and Pietro Perugino (ca. 1450­–1523), and their northern contemporaries such as Jan van Eyck (ca. 1390–1441) and Hans Memling (1430/1440–1494). Truth and Beauty will trace the Brotherhood through the nineteenth-century “rediscovery” of Sandro Botticelli (1444 or 1445–1510) by the English art critics John Ruskin (1819–1900) and Walter Pater (1839–1894), which paralleled the tempera-paint revival executed by the second-generation Pre-Raphaelites. The visual affinities between these works will create evocative juxtapositions that will also demonstrate the influence of High Renaissance painter Raphael (1483–1520) and artists of the late Renaissance, such as Titian (ca. 1488–1576) and Paolo Veronese (1528–1588), on the Pre-Raphaelites and select contemporaries. Their attraction to the art of the past was not limited to paintings, however, and the presentation will also feature stained glass and tapestries in emulation of Flemish and French textiles. The varied sources that informed the Pre-Raphaelite’s aesthetic vocabulary in dialogue with their own nineteenth-century creations will demonstrate the importance of the work that inspired the PRB and redefine more broadly the PRB’s style. These arrangements will highlight the nuanced paradoxes of the Pre-Raphaelite mission, namely, their efforts to be fundamentally modern by emulating the past, as well as their dichotomous criticism and veneration of Raphael and his artistic impact. Pre-Raphael: The Inspiration of Early Italian and Early Netherlandish Art The jewel-toned color palette of the Pre-Raphaelites emulated that of early Netherlandish artists, including Jan van Eyck (ca. 1390–1441) and Hans Memling (1430/1440–1494), whose panels Rossetti and Holman Hunt admired in Bruges on an 1849 “Pre-Raphaelite pilgrimage.” As students training at the Royal Academy, they also could study works from the national collection, which was housed in the same building. There they would have known a rare example from the early Flemish school on public view in London at that time, Van Eyck’s Arnolfini Portrait (1434, National Gallery, London). The Rediscovery of Botticelli and the Tempera Revival Pre-Raphaelite artists, including Holman Hunt, Millais, and second-generation Pre-Raphaelite Edward Burne-Jones (1833–1898), all traveled to Italy. Burne-Jones, known as the “English Quattrocentist,” made four visits and filled his sketchbooks with depictions of the works that impressed him, especially in Florence’s Uffizi Gallery. During his second trip, in 1862, he traveled with Ruskin, who, along with Pater, is credited with the “rediscovery” of Botticelli in the nineteenth century. On his third visit, in 1873, Burne-Jones spent time with the English artist John Roddam Spencer Stanhope (1829–1908), who owned a villa in the hills outside of Florence. Stanhope’s own works—including his masterpiece, Love and the Maiden (1877, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco)—reflect access to Botticelli’s paintings in the Uffizi Gallery. Such unmediated observations revealed subtleties that reproductions of the paintings of the time could not supply, and encouraged attempts by the Pre-Raphaelites to recover old master painting techniques. The Influence of Raphael and the “Post-Raphaelites” Although the Pre-Raphaelites’ initial style ostensibly rejected the idealized aesthetics of Raphael, his followers, and the Baroque artists, these parameters fluctuated over the course of each artist’s career. Paradoxically, the Pre-Raphaelites’ “Immortals” list also included Raphael himself along with select “Post-Raphaelites” such as Veronese and Tintoretto (1560–1635). Examples from Rossetti’s mature period are perhaps the most evocative examples of this development, and in paintings such as Monna Vanna (1866, Tate, London) and Veronica Veronese (1872, Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington), the artist overtly emulated Raphael and Veronese, respectively. Given Rossetti’s early proclamations of disdain for the “Post-Raphaelite” aesthetic, these sumptuous paintings reveal a surprising shift in his appreciation for the Italian Renaissance, particularly sixteenth-century Venetian paintings. Decorative Arts: Tapestries, Stained Glass, and Ecclesiastic Decorations First- and second-generation Pre-Raphaelites collected works by the old masters and filled their homes with harmonious decorative arts. They lived among these objects and also designed “medievalized” merchandise, including lush tapestries with figures and flora that quote from Flemish and French precedents. This final section of the exhibition will suggest compelling connections between sixteenth-century and nineteenth-century textiles, punctuated by complementary stained glass and decorations, together creating a rich multimedia experience in Rosekrans Court.

SAN FRANSISCO
Truth and Beauty: The Pre-Raphaelites and the Old Masters
Dates:30.06.2018-30.09.2018

In 1848—a year of political revolution across Europe—seven young Englishmen formed an artistic alliance aspiring to rebel against the contemporary Victorian art world. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, including William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, defied idealized figures popularized by Raphael and other High Renaissance artists to reflect the simplicity, spirituality, and beauty they found in late medieval and early Renaissance art. Truth and Beauty: The Pre-Raphaelites and the Old Masters is the first major exhibition to juxtapose examples by the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood with works that inspired its members, including Italian old masters Fra Angelico and Pietro Perugino and their northern contemporaries Jan van Eyck and Hans Memling. It reveals how the Brotherhood’s aesthetic evolved over time to embrace artistic influences from the High and late Renaissance, such as Botticelli, Raphael, Titian and Veronese. It also offers a rich multimedia opportunity to examine the artists’ attraction to stained glass, domestic decorations, and sixteenth-century textiles.

Villard-Bonnot
Une demi-journée en compagnie d'Alfons Mucha
Dates:30.06.2018-30.06.2018

Dans le cadre de l’exposition, et en partenariat avec les Presses universitaires de Grenoble, le musée propose une rencontre autour de Mucha avec trois temps forts :

14h-15h : Visite commentée de l’exposition par Sylvie Vincent, commissaire de l’exposition Nombre de places limité

15h30-17h30 : Rencontre-discussion en présence de Lucie Goujard (maître de conférence d’histoire de l’art contemporain à l’université Grenoble-Alpes) et Thierry Devynck (conservateur à la bibliothèque Forney à Paris, spécialiste de l’affiche et de l’art publicitaire)

17h30 : Dédicace de l’ouvrage « Alfons Mucha, affichiste entre Art nouveau et industrie » en présence des auteurs

Gratuit, inscription conseillée

Amsterdam
Van Gogh & Japan
Dates:23.03.2018-24.06.2018

Van Gogh created his own image of Japan by studying and reading about Japanese art, collecting and copying prints, and discussing their aesthetic qualities with other artists. His encounter with Japanese prints helped him to give his work a new direction. The exhibition will demonstrate, step by step, how Van Gogh bent the Japanese example to his will. In this way he defined himself as a modern artist and positioned himself opposite such artists as Emile Bernard and Paul Gauguin. The size, nature and importance of Van Gogh’s own collection of Japanese prints will be explored in detail, as will the role played by his prints in the renewal of his own idiom.

Bruxelles
Victor Horta and Brussels
Dates:15.01.2018-31.12.2018

This exhibition, organised by the Directorate of Monuments and Sites in the Brussels Capital Region, provides an overall introduction to the work of architect Victor Horta with a presentation of his major works built in Brussels. It invites visitors to discover the secrets behind the creative work of one of Art Nouveau's greatest artists, a movement which revolutionised European spatial and architectural concepts at the dawn of the 20th century. A series of photographs, documents and plans highlight the value of this extraordinary legacy.

Bruxelles
Visite Art nouveau? Art Déco? avenue Anatole France
Dates:30.06.2018-30.06.2018

Portes sculptées ou agrémentées de vitraux, façades aux lignes courbes ou géométriques, l'avenue Anatole France mérite qu'on prenne le temps de la découvrir. Art nouveau? Art Déco? Le guide vous aidera à faire la différence entre ces deux courants architecturaux et décoratifs souvent confondus. Tarif : 10€ Tarif réduit : 5€ Gratuit pour les moins de 6 ans Pass famille (2 adultes + 2 enfants) : 25€ Rendez-vous à l'entrée du parc de Verlaine, avenue de Boufflers, Sur réservation préalable obligatoire à l'office de tourisme de Nancy, place Stanislas

Saint-Etienne
Visite guidée - L'art nouveau à Saint-Etienne
Dates:05.07.2018-05.07.2018

Visite à 2 voix entre un guide conférencier et un collectionneur passionné d'art nouveau. Téléphone : 04 77 48 76 27 Téléphone : 04 77 49 39 00 Maill : artethistoire@saint-etienne.fr Tarif : Plein tarif : de 5 à 6 €. Tarif réduit : Personnes handicapées et leurs accompagnateurs, 16/25 ans, plus de 65 ans, familles nombreuses, adhérents des associations des amis des Musées, employés municipaux de la ville de Saint-Etienne. Gratuité : bénéficiaires du RSA, presse, titulaires de cartes professionnelless de guides, Pass Loisirs Seniors, Sainté Pass 16-25 ans. A noter : • Départ de la visite à partir de 2 personnes • Afin de veiller au confort de tous durant la visite, le guide se réserve le droit de limiter à 30 maximum le nombre de visiteurs. Merci de prévoir l'appoint pour l'achat de tickets en début de visite. Organisateur(s) : Ville d'art et d'histoire Date(s) : Jeudi 5 juillet 2018 à 14h30.

Wien
Wagner, Hoffmann, Loos and Viennese Modernist Furniture Design. Artists, Patrons, Producers
Dates:21.03.2018-07.10.2018

Viennese Modernism around 1900 was a veritable experimental laboratory of design whose creative impulses continue to have substantial influence to this day. Vienna’s artist-architects were among those who paved the way for modern design. The Hofmobiliendepot – Vienna Imperial Furniture Collection presents the leading architects of the Viennese Modernist movement – Otto Wagner (1841–1918), Josef Hoffmann (1870–1956) and Adolf Loos (1870–1933) – as designers of interiors and furniture, exploring their differing approaches to the conception, use, decoration and furnishing of interior spaces. Around the turn of the century in Vienna a creative collaboration had developed between architects, their patrons and furniture producers. The exhibition will thus foreground important examples of these patrons, for example the salonière and journalist Berta Zuckerkandl, and will also focus on the firms that made this furniture. Among the leading companies around 1900 were traditional furnishing establishments such as Friedrich Otto Schmidt and Portois & Fix as well as producers of bentwood furniture like Gebrüder Thonet and J. & J. Kohn. Illustrative examples of iconic Modernist buildings in Vienna such as Otto Wagner’s Postal Savings Bank are integrated into the exhibition in the form of large-scale architectural photographs by Walter Zednicek.

Cleveland Ohio
William Morris: Designing an Earthly Paradise
Dates:29.10.2017-25.11.2018

William Morris devoted his life to creating beautiful and useful objects using the highest-quality materials under fair labor conditions. His richly varied patterns have been reproduced without interruption since his death in 1896, testifying to their timeless appeal. The Cleveland Museum of Art’s collection includes woven and block-printed textiles spanning each stage of Morris’s vibrant career; they are joined in this exhibition by a generous loan from the Cranbrook Art Museum of an embroidery by William Morris’s daughter, May. Also showcased are magnificent volumes from the Cleveland Museum of Art’s nearly complete collection of books printed by Kelmscott Press. Morris’s meticulously designed books were his final labor of love; indeed, they exhibit the same delight in organic forms and time-tested craftsmanship visible in his textiles. The voices of May Morris, Kate Faulkner, Walter Crane, and Edward Burne-Jones also feature among the projects that Morris so passionately brought to fruition. With Morris & Co. wallpaper and carpet reproductions, the exhibition Designing an Earthly Paradise brings to life Morris’s striking, revolutionary designs. Presenting Sponsors: Emma and Cathy Lincoln The Cleveland Museum of Art is supported in part by Cuyahoga County residents through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture. The Ohio Arts Council helped fund this exhibition with state tax dollars to encourage economic growth, educational excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans.