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Guided tours and workshops for families Daddy, Mummy, Horta and me ! at the Horta Museum in Brussels – from 7 to 17 April 2015


During the school vacations, the Horta Museum will open its doors on Mornings to the children and parents for an adapted visit to each age. The space of the servants of the house will be exceptionally open for the occasion.
The visit will take the shape of a role-play for the oldest and a treasure hunt for the youngest and enables to discover an a pro-active way the extraordinary house and Victor Horta’s wonderful universe.
After the visit, a creative workshop will be offered, so that everyone can create a work inspired from Nature, in relation with Art Nouveau – different workshop each week (stained-glass, mosaic, mural painting, Art Nouveau house in paper, animals in paper).

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Practical information:
Spring holidays: from 7 to 17 April 2015
Summer holidays: from 30 June to 1st August 2015

From Monday to Friday from 9.30 to 12.30 am
Price per mornings: 8,00 € / adult and 5,00€ / child
Registration by phone : 0032 (0)2 543 04 90
Or by e-mail : info@hortamuseum.be
Be careful: groups are limited to 10 persons maximum per morning and only available for adults accompanied by children from 6 to 12 years-old.


Picture: Victor Horta, detail, Horta Museum, Brussels, 1898-1901

Exhibition Ways to Modernism at the MAK in Vienna – from 17 December 2014 to 14 April 2015


Josef Hoffmann (1870–1956) and Adolf Loos (1870–1933) were the most important architects and designers in Vienna around 1900 in the generation after Otto Wagner. They developed two contrary approaches to the expression of individuality and self-realization among modern consumers. Josef Hoffmann followed a revolutionary path that led to the creation of utilitarian objects and architecture as aesthetic products in an ever-changing array of new designs. Adolf Loos pursued an evolutionary strategy that viewed utilitarian objects and architecture not as art products, but as the discrete background for individual lifestyles. These two contrary mindsets represent fundamental interpretations of the tasks of modern architects and designers as well as different images of modern lifestyles of the emancipated citizen.

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Picture: Portraits of Josef Hoffmann and Adolf Loos, 1903 © MAK, Vienna

Exhibition The Norwegian Japonism at the Jugendsilsenteret in Ålesund – from 26 September 2014 to 7 April 2015


The movement that is now spreading from Japan across Europe”

This quote from the Norwegian artist Gerhard Munthe (1849–1929) refers to one of the main trends in European art from the mid-19th century through the early decades of the 20th century.

In 1853, Japan opened its borders to the outside world after 200 years of isolation. This lead to a cult of all things Japanese among European artists – a movement labelled as Japonism from the 1860s–70s onward. This Japanese-inspired art did not constitute a style as such, but greatly influenced a number of styles in European art. In the 1880s and 1890s, Japonism became a major ingredient of the Art Nouveau style. In Norway, Art Nouveau peaked in popularity in the years between 1890 and 1910.

This exhibition looks at the connections between the Art Nouveau style, the nation-building project in Norway, and the Japonism movement as expressed in Norwegian Art Nouveau. Starting with Gerhard Munthe, considered the leading proponent of Japonism in Norway, the exhibition highlights connections between Japonism and the distinct national character of Norwegian Art Nouveau in terms of technique, range of motifs, format, and choice of materials.

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Picture: Color woodcut on paper by Fujimaru Kitagawa, Japan. Probably the first half of the 1800th century © Jugendstilsenteret, Aalesund

This major retrospective presents for the first time the complete artistic range of the Darmstadt Artists’ Colony’s founding member Hans Christiansen (1866-1945). The many interesting facets of this renowned artist of art nouveau can finally be seen together in one large exhibition conceived by the Institut Mathildenhöhe and the Museumsberg Flensburg in collaboration with the Museum Villa Stuck in Munich and the Bröhan-Museum Berlin.

Hans Christiansen is one of the most important representatives of Jugendstil, the German version of the aesthetic revolution commonly called art nouveau. After achieving much success in Paris with his designs for the decorative arts, Christiansen was appointed in 1899 as the first member of the Darmstadt Artists' Colony founded by Ernst Ludwig, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine.

As part of the Artists' Colony on the Mathildenhöhe Darmstadt, Christiansen blossomed and excelled as a visual artist and designer, making full use of his artistic freedom in Darmstadt guaranteed by the Grand Duke. In the retrospective, many of Christiansen’s designs can be seen alongside the realized artworks giving insight into the versatility of the artist, who also staged elaborate fireworks and light installations. The exhibition covers all phases of Christiansen’s work from Hamburg and Paris to Darmstadt and Wiesbaden, and presents furniture ensembles, stained glass, jewelry, posters, paintings, drawings, textile art, ceramics, as well as hitherto unknown fashion and poster designs from the 1920s. A special focus is placed on the artist’s own house on the Mathildenhöhe that he designed for himself together with the architect and fellow Artists’ Colony member Joseph Maria Olbrich.

The retrospective features many previously un-exhibited works from the estate of the artist that now belongs to the Museumsberg Flensburg, as well as works from the Darmstadt Municipal Art Collection and loans from museums and private collections.

Following the first presentation of the this retrospective at Mathildenhöhe Darmstadt, the exhibition will travel to the Bröhan-Museum Berlin, followed by the Museum Villa Stuck in Munich and the Museumsberg Flensburg, where the show will end in the artist’s place of birth just before his 150th birthday.

Curators:
Dr. Philipp Gutbrod, curator and conservator of the collection, Mathildenhöhe Darmstadt Institute
Dr. Michael Fuhr, Director, Museumsberg in Flensburg
Dr. Dorothee Bieske, curator and conservator of the collection, Museumsberg in Flensburg

An exhibition of the Mathildenhöhe Darmstadt Institute and of the Museumsberg in Flensburg in collaboration with the Villa Stuck Museum in Munich and the Bröhan Museum in Berlin.

The exhibition will then travel to the Bröhan Museum, Berlin (19 Feburary– 24 May 2015), the Museum Villa Stuck in Munich (18 June – 20 September 2015) and to the Museumsberg Flensburg (11 October – 17 January 2016).

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Picture: Hans Christiansen (1866-1945) © Mathildenhöhe Darmstadt

Exhibition Kokoschka & Gauguin decrypted at the Fin-de-Siècle Museum in Brussels – from 22 July 2014 to 25 January 2015


See the invisible

Two major paintings – the Portrait of Suzanne Bambridge by Gauguin and Kokoschka’s Trance Player – are at the centre of the experience. Through an innovative technology – the digital analysis of “multispectral” images – you will learn more about these paintings and, in a broader way, understand the advantages of this method for the conservation of artworks.

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Picture: Oskar Kokoschka, Der Trancespieler. Oil on canvas, ca. 1909. Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, inv. 6152 © RMFAB, Brussels, photo: J. Geleyns / Ro Scan

With the support of the Culture Programme of the European Union

Responsible publisher: Arlette Verkruyssen, General Director,
Brussels Regional Public Service - Bruxelles Développement urbain (Brussels Urban Development),
CCN - Rue du Progrès 80, B. 1, 1035 Brussels - Belgium