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Ongoing and upcoming Art Nouveau exhibitions, visits and more...

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Winter Park, Florida
Revival and Reform—Eclecticism in the 19th-Century Environment
Dates:21/10/2014-21/10/2015

The Arts window by J. & R. Lamb Studios is the centerpiece of this major new exhibition that illustrates the rich diversity of styles that made up the aesthetic environment of the late 19th century in both Europe and America. Lamb Studios, a prominent American glasshouse of the era, exhibited the 1894 neoclassical window widely. In preparation for its debut at the Morse, the window, more than eight feet in diameter, underwent extensive conservation. The installation features 20 additional leaded-glass windows and selections of art glass, pottery, and furniture, a number of which also have never been exhibited. Other windows on view—some avant-garde, others reviving the past—include examples by Tiffany Studios, John LaFarge, Frank Lloyd Wright, Edward Burne-Jones, Donald MacDonald, and Heaton, Butler & Bayne.

Winter Park, Florida
Secrets of Tiffany Glassmaking
Dates:04/09/2012-04/09/2020

Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933) began his work in glass with the same tools and ingredients that had been used by artisans for thousands of years before him. Tiffany took the science of glassmaking, however, and elevated it to an art form of new brilliance and beauty. Under his watch, teams of talented designers and craftspeople translated Tiffany’s all-encompassing vision into some of the most memorable glass creations of our time. Tiffany’s studio system was not a simple enterprise; he needed specialized employees—a hierarchy of artists and artisans—to accomplish his goals. This exhibition, updated and reinstalled on September 4, 2012, addresses the processes that Tiffany’s many companies used to produce everything from glass mosaics and molded buttons to leaded-glass lamps and windows.

Winter Park, Florida
Selections from the Harry C. Sigman Collection of European and American Decorative Art
Dates:10/02/2015-10/02/2016

In this exhibit, the Museum debuts a selection from Harry C. Sigman’s 2014 gift of 86 objects to the Morse. Sigman, a Los Angeles attorney, began collecting European and American decorative art in 1969, and his gift dovetails with the late 19th- and early 20th-century styles represented in the Morse collection. The donation includes art glass, pottery, metalwork, and furniture. Though comprised mainly of Jeannette and Hugh McKean’s massive gift, the Morse collection has always been supported by generous individuals such as Harry Sigman whose contributions have helped it to grow in important ways. The finely crafted objects on view can be appreciated both individually and in the context of the Museum’s entire collection.

Winter Park, Florida
The Bride Elect—Gifts from the 1905 Wedding of Elizabeth Owens Morse
Dates:10/02/2015-10/02/2016

In 1905 Elizabeth Owens Morse, the daughter of Charles Hosmer Morse and Martha Owens Morse, married Richard Genius. The gift registry of this socially prominent Chicago bride—entitled “The Bride Elect”—survives in the Morse Museum’s archive, showing more than 250 gifts. Together these items provide a snapshot of the era, a glimpse into 1905 gift-giving traditions, and some insight into popular retail decisions made by wealthy consumers in the Chicago area. In this new exhibition, the Morse presents a representative group of the lovely gifts that survive from the Morse-Genius wedding, including Tiffany art glass, Rookwood pottery, and Gorham silver.

Venice
The Divine Marchesa - Art and life of Luisa Casati from the Belle Époque to the roaring twenties
Dates:03/10/2014-08/03/2015

Venice evokes the figure of the woman and the myth that fascinated d'Annunzio and his follies became the muse of the greatest artists of the time as Boldini, Bakst, by Marinetti in Balla, from Man Ray to Alberto Martini, Van Dongen Romain and Brooks.

Palazzo Fortuny in Venice, one of the "places" most loved by the Divine Marchesa, will be the site of the first extraordinary exhibition dedicated to Luisa Casati Stampa, the woman who in the early twentieth century, with the exaggerated makeup, the transgressive and eccentric performance and life over the top, he was able to transform itself into a work of art, a living legend, disturbing and surprising representation of modernity and avant-garde.

The exhibition, conceived by Daniela Ferretti, edited by Fabio Benzi and Gioia Mori, is co-produced by the Civic Museums Foundation of Venice and 24 ORE Cultura - Gruppo 24 Ore, has over one hundred works, including paintings, drawings, jewelry, sculptures, photographs and clothes from private collections and international museums.

The extraordinary collection of art works and portraits that were devoted to her or commissioned pieces will be on display in the exhibition come from private collections, such as the head of polychrome ceramic work of Renato Bertelli, The Marchesa Casati Romain and Brooks and sculpture by Paolo Troubetzkoy portrait of the Marchesa Casati with a greyhound. He subsequently joined by masterpieces from museums around the world such as Portrait of the Marchesa Casati by Giovanni Boldini GNAM of Rome, Marchesa Casati by Augustus Edwin John the Art Gallery of Ontario, the many portraits which he dedicated Alberto Martini, Lines of force landscape maiolicato of Giacomo Balla and jewelry by Cartier inspired her.

To note is the many photographs of Luisa Casati Stampa: from the shots of Gayne Adolphe de Meyer, Man Ray and Mariano Fortuny, to those stolen, when he lived in poverty in London, Cecil Beaton.

The exhibition, through constant references, reconstructs the social and artistic life of the crossed Luisa Casati Stampa: the gilded cage of high society encounter with Gabriele d'Annunzio - that forever changed and became a bond of love and friendship that lasted a lifetime - from the extravagant costumes, the practice of the occult period to arrive at the "futurist" Filippo Tommaso Marinetti in which he meets and marries the cause of the artistic movement, promoting artists and collecting their works , ending with economic ruin and exile in the British capital where he died in July 1957.

Three floors of Palazzo Fortuny "immerse" the visitor into the atmosphere in which he lived the Divine Marchesa that, for half a century, he was a living legend, a dark lady, a major art collector and patron, muse of the Symbolists, the Fauves, Futurists and surrealists: a myth that still inspires artists today and the great house of haute couture.

Ljubljana
The Nature of Art Nouveau - Nova Umetnost in narava
Dates:20/01/2015-19/04/2015

Organised by the Réseau Art Nouveau Network in the framework of the European project "Art Nouveau & Ecology" (2010-2015) supported by the Culture 2007-2013 programme of the European Commission, the exhibition comprises two identical concurrent exhibitions and has begun its journey to all partner cities in October 2013.

After Barcelona, the exhibition The Nature of Art Nouveau 1 will be presented in Ljubljana at the Narodni Muzej Slovenije, fifth step of its European journey, from 20 January until 19 April 2015.

This exhibition is free and bilingual Slovene-English.

Alesund
The Norwegian Japonism
Dates:26/09/2014-07/04/2015

“The movement that is now spreading from Japan across Europe”

This quote from the Norwegian artist Gerhard Munthe (1849–1929) refers to one of the main trends in European art from the mid-19th century through the early decades of the 20th century.

In 1853, Japan opened its borders to the outside world after 200 years of isolation. This lead to a cult of all things Japanese among European artists – a movement labelled as Japonism from the 1860s–70s onward. This Japanese-inspired art did not constitute a style as such, but greatly influenced a number of styles in European art. In the 1880s and 1890s, Japonism became a major ingredient of the Art Nouveau style. In Norway, Art Nouveau peaked in popularity in the years between 1890 and 1910.

This exhibition looks at the connections between the Art Nouveau style, the nation-building project in Norway, and the Japonism movement as expressed in Norwegian Art Nouveau. Starting with Gerhard Munthe, considered the leading proponent of Japonism in Norway, the exhibition highlights connections between Japonism and the distinct national character of Norwegian Art Nouveau in terms of technique, range of motifs, format, and choice of materials.

With the support of the Culture Programme of the European Union

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